Research News

February 11, 2015

Research, New Policies Protect “The Lungs of India”

You can’t see into the lungs of the people of Agra, India, home of the Taj Mahal. But just a glance at what should be pristine white marble domes of the local landmark shows that air quality is a major concern. The iconic domes are tarnished and need frequent cleaning to keep them white. A study by [...]

February 06, 2015

Wiesner and Daubechies Named National Academy of Engineering Members

Mark Wiesner, the James L. Meriam Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Ingrid Daubechies, professor of electrical and computer engineering and the James B. Duke Professor of Mathematics, have been named members of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE)—one of the highest [...]

February 03, 2015

Creating Virtual Wind for Physical Turbines

It’s hard to figure out which way the wind blows. It’s full of random fluctuations, changes of direction, currents and eddies, and it can have a completely different profile a short distance away. And it doesn’t help that it’s invisible. But accurately creating computer models of the wind is [...]

January 27, 2015

Michael Bergin: Studying Tiny Particles with a Giant Global Impact

Michael Bergin joined the Pratt School of Engineering’s Civil and Environmental Engineering Department in January 2015. An expert on aerosols, Bergin studies the environmental and human health effects of natural and manmade microscopic particles floating all around the Earth’s atmosphere. Ranging [...]

January 09, 2015

Mercury from Gold Mines Accumulates Hundreds of Miles Downstream

Researchers have determined that the health risks taken on by artisanal, small-scale gold miners extend far beyond the miners themselves. Based on a study of gold-mining operations in Peru, the miners’ practices not only contaminate local soil, sediment and water resources with mercury, they create [...]

October 30, 2014

Boadu Named Carnegie African Diaspora Fellow

Fred Boadu, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, has been named a Carnegie African Diaspora Fellow. The scholar program supports 100 short-term faculty fellowships for African-born academics and is offered by the Institute of International Education and funded by a two-year [...]

October 08, 2014

Mona Dai: Treating Contaminated Drinking Water in Uganda

As part of the NAE Grand Challenge Scholars Program, I am focusing on the challenge of providing clean drinking water access to all. My research project focuses specifically on the impact of using ceramic water filters (CWF) to treat contaminated drinking water in Uganda. Ceramic water filters are [...]

October 01, 2014

Nanoparticles Accumulate Quickly in Wetland Sediment

A Duke University team has found that nanoparticles called single-walled carbon nanotubes accumulate quickly in the bottom sediments of an experimental wetland setting, an action they say could indirectly damage the aquatic food chain. The results indicate little risk to humans ingesting the [...]

September 10, 2014

Inaugural Vest Scholar Works to Protect Water Purity

This fall, Duke welcomes its first Charles M. Vest NAE Grand Challenges for Engineering International Scholar to campus. Reminiscent of a reverse Rhodes Scholarship, the award gives international graduate students the opportunity to spend a year at one of nine universities in the United States [...]

August 25, 2014

How to Make Nanoparticles

One of the keystones of the scientific method is reproducibility. Without the ability to check your own work—or others’ results—under the exact same conditions with the exact same materials, findings become almost meaningless. And you can forget about colleagues building on previous results. That’s [...]

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