News

A group of people at a podium with a blue background Featured

July 01, 2022

Duke Technology Launches PFAS-Destroying Waste Treatment Company to Nasdaq

Based on supercritical water oxidation waste treatment technology invented on Duke’s campus, 374Water rings Nasdaq’s bell

April 29, 2014

Pratt's MicroCT Scanner Peers into Every Dimension

The MicroCT scanner at Duke University is available for use by anyone

April 08, 2014

CEINT's French Connection

Duke's Center for the Environmental Impact of NanoTechnology has had strong international ties since its inception that continue to provide opportunities to students and faculty alike

April 06, 2014

Q&A: Duke's Heileen Hsu-Kim

Hsu-Kim is a professor leading a phenomenal early career in geochemistry

March 05, 2014

Tuning NASA's Newest Weather Satellite to Improve Forecasts

Duke engineers taking Earth-based measurements to calibrate NASA’s newest weather satellite

February 21, 2014

Duke’s StartupConnect Attracts Startups, Hundreds of Attendees

Pratt School of Engineering co-sponsors event that showcases entrepreneurial opportunities

February 13, 2014

New Test Screens Wastewater Biosolids for Environmental Contaminants

Simple, inexpensive method assesses environmental and agricultural effects of treated waste used as fertilizer

November 11, 2013

Duke Wins $15 Million Grant Renewal to Study Effects of Nanomaterials

How are nanomaterials affecting the environment—and us? With a new grant renewal, CEINT researchers seek answers

September 23, 2013

Ph.D. Plus Gives Engineering Graduate Students Career Edge

Students learn essential business skills to prepare for industry jobs

July 09, 2013

Pressure Cooker on Steroids Treats Human Waste

Like alchemists, engineers from Duke University and the University of Missouri are developing a process to turn sewage into drinkable water, energy and useful byproducts at a cost of less than a nickel per person per day.

May 20, 2013

For Tropical Rainfall, Timing Is Everything

With changes in the global climate, certain regions of the tropics will likely experience growing unpredictability of their seasonal cycles of rain and drought, according to a new analysis by Duke and Princeton University engineers.

Pages